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21 Notes

newsweek:

Geraldine Ferraro’s 1984 Vice Presidential Acceptance Speech. The first female VP candidate for a major party ticket, Ferraro died on Saturday at the age of 75.

468 Notes

jessbennett:

Oh, Sweet Valley, you’re back, and I love you, even if I’ve seriously outgrown you. And since I tried my very best to (unsuccessfully) convince the non-80s-reared editors in my office that you were a REAL phenom among us Gen X/Millennial gals, three interesting factoids from my profile of Francine Pascal, in advance of her latest, Sweet Valley Confidential:

1. Francine Pascal had never set foot in California when she birthed the Sweet Valley series. A lifelong New Yorker, she grew up in a Jewish family in Queens.
2. In 1985, Sweet Valley High was the first teen fiction to ever appear on The New York Times paperback bestsellers list, alongside John Updike and Norman Mailer.
3. In the beginning, Sweet Valley was deemed too “commercial” for many booksellers, who refused to stock it. The Times snubbed the series (despite it appearing on their bestseller list), and librarians fought to keep their stacks free of the “skimpy-looking  paperbacks,” as one library journal put it. Nevertheless, the series became a  case study in how to get young girls to read.

And now, all the 1980s chick-lit nostalgia to bring you back, in one tidy Daily Beast gallery.

Every time Bennett brought up her devilish affection for these books, I thought, “This explains so much.”

jessbennett:

Oh, Sweet Valley, you’re back, and I love you, even if I’ve seriously outgrown you. And since I tried my very best to (unsuccessfully) convince the non-80s-reared editors in my office that you were a REAL phenom among us Gen X/Millennial gals, three interesting factoids from my profile of Francine Pascal, in advance of her latest, Sweet Valley Confidential:

1. Francine Pascal had never set foot in California when she birthed the Sweet Valley series. A lifelong New Yorker, she grew up in a Jewish family in Queens.

2. In 1985, Sweet Valley High was the first teen fiction to ever appear on The New York Times paperback bestsellers list, alongside John Updike and Norman Mailer.

3. In the beginning, Sweet Valley was deemed too “commercial” for many booksellers, who refused to stock it. The Times snubbed the series (despite it appearing on their bestseller list), and librarians fought to keep their stacks free of the “skimpy-looking paperbacks,” as one library journal put it. Nevertheless, the series became a case study in how to get young girls to read.

And now, all the 1980s chick-lit nostalgia to bring you back, in one tidy Daily Beast gallery.

Every time Bennett brought up her devilish affection for these books, I thought, “This explains so much.”

468 Notes

jessbennett:

Oh, Sweet Valley, you’re back, and I love you, even if I’ve seriously outgrown you. And since I tried my very best to (unsuccessfully) convince the non-80s-reared editors in my office that you were a REAL phenom among us Gen X/Millennial gals, three interesting factoids from my profile of Francine Pascal, in advance of her latest, Sweet Valley Confidential:

1. Francine Pascal had never set foot in California when she birthed the Sweet Valley series. A lifelong New Yorker, she grew up in a Jewish family in Queens.
2. In 1985, Sweet Valley High was the first teen fiction to ever appear on The New York Times paperback bestsellers list, alongside John Updike and Norman Mailer.
3. In the beginning, Sweet Valley was deemed too “commercial” for many booksellers, who refused to stock it. The Times snubbed the series (despite it appearing on their bestseller list), and librarians fought to keep their stacks free of the “skimpy-looking  paperbacks,” as one library journal put it. Nevertheless, the series became a  case study in how to get young girls to read.

And now, all the 1980s chick-lit nostalgia to bring you back, in one tidy Daily Beast gallery.

Every time Bennett brought up her devilish affection for these books, I thought, “This explains so much.”

jessbennett:

Oh, Sweet Valley, you’re back, and I love you, even if I’ve seriously outgrown you. And since I tried my very best to (unsuccessfully) convince the non-80s-reared editors in my office that you were a REAL phenom among us Gen X/Millennial gals, three interesting factoids from my profile of Francine Pascal, in advance of her latest, Sweet Valley Confidential:

1. Francine Pascal had never set foot in California when she birthed the Sweet Valley series. A lifelong New Yorker, she grew up in a Jewish family in Queens.

2. In 1985, Sweet Valley High was the first teen fiction to ever appear on The New York Times paperback bestsellers list, alongside John Updike and Norman Mailer.

3. In the beginning, Sweet Valley was deemed too “commercial” for many booksellers, who refused to stock it. The Times snubbed the series (despite it appearing on their bestseller list), and librarians fought to keep their stacks free of the “skimpy-looking paperbacks,” as one library journal put it. Nevertheless, the series became a case study in how to get young girls to read.

And now, all the 1980s chick-lit nostalgia to bring you back, in one tidy Daily Beast gallery.

Every time Bennett brought up her devilish affection for these books, I thought, “This explains so much.”

72 Notes

4 Notes

Cee Lo and his Goodie Mob (!) at GQ’s Super Bowl XLV party in Dallas on Friday night.

Cee Lo and his Goodie Mob (!) at GQ’s Super Bowl XLV party in Dallas on Friday night.

11 Notes

His and hers. People across from us on the BOS-NYC Franztrak.

His and hers. People across from us on the BOS-NYC Franztrak.

2245 Notes

Fatherhood is adorable

Fatherhood is adorable

82 Notes

lotusmodern:

Jane and Serge.

lotusmodern:

Jane and Serge.

1225 Notes

iwdrm:

“I would like all at once: to be your wife … and to amuse me like a prostitute.”
La dolce vita (1960)

iwdrm:

“I would like all at once: to be your wife … and to amuse me like a prostitute.”

La dolce vita (1960)

337 Notes

thedailywhat:

Interactive Feature of the Day: The New York Times marks the conclusion of NYC’s Times Square rejuvenation campaign, which began some 30 years ago, with a nifty interactive look at the city’s iconic intersection then and now.
[nyt.]

Yep. Blew about 20 minutes on this tonight.

thedailywhat:

Interactive Feature of the Day: The New York Times marks the conclusion of NYC’s Times Square rejuvenation campaign, which began some 30 years ago, with a nifty interactive look at the city’s iconic intersection then and now.

[nyt.]

Yep. Blew about 20 minutes on this tonight.

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